The OddFather Podcast

Two guys who like science and probably think too much, but also love God and love being His children, get together with a common understanding.

This God they love is really confusing.

How has the world we live in shaped what we believe about what believe? And why do these two find their Father so odd?

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Latest

  • Ep 62: Too Much Information
    Chris and Pete love a bit of science and science is replicable. The same experiment gets the same results, that sort of thing. But what about faith, the bible, and God? Is it the same for us all? Nope. Here they check out the work of Korean philosopher Byung-Chul Han who reckons knowing stuff makes it hard for us to work together in communities. Have we started to lose ourselves in facts?
  • Ep 61: Do I Bless God?
    There’s all these bits in the bible where people bless God, but what have I got that god needs? What is a blessing for God? Chris and Pete return to the love Dog and see if they can unpack this bizarre twist… how do the blessed ones bless the one who blesses us? Can we be the unknowing and irrelevant ones?
  • Ep 60: The God of Evil?
    Chris and Pete unfurl another of those curly questions. Did God create Evil? Are bad things hand crafted by the loving creator of the universe, was badness? Have we humans given evil a face, made it into a thing, or is it something else? Are Dark, Cold, and Evil merely absences and what does it matter to us?
  • Ep 59: Drinkin’ With Jesus
    Chris and Pete pull the cork on an event that has torn apart churches and communities for generations, when Jesus turned water into wine. What was he thinking?! They ask what it means to us today. Did Jesus get folks drunk? Is he okay with wine? Or are we just doing what we want and deliberately misrepresenting things?
  • Ep 58: Are You a Good Dog?
    Chris and Pete crack open the ancient poetry book and read from the 13th century a poem that suggests we should all be whining dogs. Is that a useful thing? How do we see ourselves? And what happens if we rethink that?